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The Best Books I Read in 2017—and Two I Hated

Every year, I start with the goal of reading at least 52 books, and this year I made it—54 and counting as I publish this—even though one of them was Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables, which seemed like it would never end—not that that bothered me at all. I’d have a hard time coming up with a novel this good that is both thouroughly Christian and thoroughly libertarian.

Opposing War Affirms the Power of the Resurrection

And though we’re told that we should trust the president (or the king, or the prime minister, or the high priest, or whomever) because that’s the pragmatic way to ensure security, war always makes things worse, and it always breeds more war.

Church and state should not mix, but faith and politics must; indeed, a faith without politics denies one of the essential claims of Jesus—that he is sovereign—and blocks us from experiencing the abundance of a life following him.

The Libertarian Case Against Gary Johnson

Guest post contributed by Scott Cosenza, Policy Director for One Generation Away

Gary Johnson wasn’t in the first presidential debate of 2016, and, as a libertarian, I’m happy about that.

It makes me happy because every day Gary Johnson is out there being listened to, he damages the chances for liberty to take hold in the minds and hearts of Americans. He is either ignorant, as I suspect, about the principles that animate support for Libertarians™ amongst those of us who are libertarians, and why those are important, or he just doesn’t care. In either case his candidacy is unacceptable.

Gary Johnson knows exactly what to do about Aleppo

In fact, Johnson a) did answer “a basic question about the crisis in Aleppo, Syria,” and b) did so not with a “surprising lack of foreign policy knowledge,” but with a sensible, clear approach to the Syria crisis that acknowledges both the specific geopolitical situation and serves as a cogent critique of the usual US foreign policy stance that has wrought Hell across the world since, let’s say, the McKinley administration.

“Making a Murderer,” “The Night Of,” and the case against the criminal justice system

Making a Murderer caused many who saw it to seriously question, if not abandon, one of the convenient fictions that most Americans believe—that, in the unlikely event we get arrested for a crime we didn’t commit, all we have to do is explain ourselves and the system will quickly realize that it made a mistake. After all, only guilty people hire lawyers.

Love Your Neighbor, or Mandate Tolerance?

Just yesterday, I mentioned on by personal Facebook page that I had added “transgender” to my list of terms that I wish I could block from my news feed. It’s neither the word nor the people it describes that sicken me, but rather the ignorant and inconsiderate attitudes that just about everyone displays when discussing the transgender bathroom issue.

And then this morning, here comes this story: U.S. Directs Public Schools to Allow Transgender Access to Restrooms. So, I guess “transgender” will be one of the key words in what promises to be the most cacophonous presidential campaign season in history.