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Compassion versus punishment in the War on Drugs

“I felt like I was doing God’s work, and then when it hit my own family I was in for an awakening,” says Kevin Simmers, a “veteran police officer.” He adds, “I believed wholheartedly that enforcement and incarceration was the answer to this, but then when addiction hit my own house I seen {sic} that that was not true…We need drug treatment, we gotta help the person.”

Opposing War Affirms the Power of the Resurrection

And though we’re told that we should trust the president (or the king, or the prime minister, or the high priest, or whomever) because that’s the pragmatic way to ensure security, war always makes things worse, and it always breeds more war.

Church and state should not mix, but faith and politics must; indeed, a faith without politics denies one of the essential claims of Jesus—that he is sovereign—and blocks us from experiencing the abundance of a life following him.

Words Matter: How “Government” differs from “the State”

Writers like Frédéric Bastiat, Albert Jay Nock, Murray Rothbard, and Franz Oppenheimer have made the invaluable distinction between the state and society, and between the political means and the economic means.

But there is a more subtle distinction that needs to be made, especially in the American context.

Americans usually refer to the thing properly called “the state” as “the government.” It’s unfortunate for clear thinking about politics that these two terms have, through long use, become interchangeable.

The Myth of Hiroshima from Truman to Obama

I understand why most Americans—especially those who were alive at the time and had been devastated by the pain and confusion of war—aren’t really interested in pushing past the simplistic myth of Hiroshima and Nagasaki that has been preserved and propagated in textbooks, speeches, and movies through the years in order to look honestly at the facts.

But I’m disturbed and ashamed that most American Christians—including my former self—also refuse to question this myth.

Meet Tom Woods: the Indispensable Libertarian

Tom Woods is the indispensable man of libertarianism.

No one alive (may Murray Rothbard rest in peace) has the knowledge of history, economics, and political philosophy and the ability to effectively communicate these ideas that Woods has.

His success as a writer and podcaster directly inspired me to start this website, and I look at the sheer scope, volume, and quality of his work as a challenge to produce quality work of my own.